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Grains Leadership Visits Mexico to Meet Customers, New Administration Officials

(Posted Tue. Nov 6th, 2018)

Keywords: trade policy

Leaders from the U.S. feed grains value chain traveled together to Mexico last week to meet with longtime customers and incoming officials from the Mexican government on the heels of the recently-concluded U.S.-Mexico-Canada Agreement (USMCA) negotiations.    The annual officers mission brings together leaders from the U.S. Grains Council (USGC) and the national organizations representing the feed grains it promotes in international markets, including the National Corn Growers Association (NCGA), the National Sorghum Producers (NSP) and United Sorghum Checkoff Program (USCP) and the National Barley Growers Association (NBGA).    Mexico is the top foreign buyer of U.S. corn, distiller's dried grains with solubles (DDGS) and barley and a significant buyer of U.S. sorghum. The country also holds near-term potential for increased use of U.S. ethanol following energy policy changes in recent years.    "Mexico is the most critical market for our members and an amazing example of...

NCGA Statement on Environmental Groups Petition to the EPA on Land Use

(Posted Wed. Oct 31st, 2018)

Keywords: ethanol policy

The following is a statement from Nebraska farmer Lynn Chrisp, president of the National Corn Growers Association (NCGA), on a petition filed by environmental and conservation groups regarding land use.   “The acreage data is very clear: farmers are planting fewer acres to corn today than we did when the Renewable Fuel Standard (RFS) was expanded,” said Lynn Chrisp, president of the National Corn Growers Association. “And it’s not just corn acres that have fallen. The area planted to principal crops is shrinking nationwide. The reality of what is happening on today’s farms is not accurately portrayed in the petition.”   Farmers planted fewer acres to corn in 2018 (89.1 million) than they did when the RFS was expanded in 2007 (93.5 million). During that same time, ethanol production expanded from 6.5 billion gallons to 15.8 billion gallons. Overall, the area planted to principal crops in the U.S. has fallen from 328.6 million acres in 2000 to 322 million acres in 2018, according...

NCGA Urges EPA and NHTSA to Recognize Benefits of High-Octane Fuels

(Posted Fri. Oct 26th, 2018)

Keywords: ethanol policy

The National Corn Growers Association today emphasized the benefits for fuel economy and emissions reductions from the use of high-octane fuels in comments to the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and National Highway Transportation Safety Administration (NHTSA) on the proposed SAFE Vehicles Rule.   “As producers of the primary feedstock used for ethanol production, corn farmers have a strong vested interest in the future of transportation fuels,” NCGA President Lynn Chrisp wrote.   The organization’s comments urged regulators to consider fuels and vehicles as a system of high-octane fuel used with optimized engines. NCGA also believes high-octane, low-carbon fuel can help support harmonization between federal and state standards.   “Pairing advanced engines with certain higher-octane fuel improves vehicle performance and efficiency while using less energy and releasing fewer emissions, particularly when the octane source is a midlevel ethanol blend,” wrote...

NCGA Welcomes Year-Round E15

(Posted Tue. Oct 9th, 2018)

Keywords: ethanol policy

National Corn Growers Association President Lynn Chrisp today praised an announcement from President Trump, setting the necessary regulatory steps in motion to allow for year-round sales of E15.   “Corn farmers across the country have been advocating for year-round sales of higher ethanol blends like E15 to help grow demand, provide consumers with more options at the pump and improve economic conditions across rural America,” said Chrisp. “We thank President Trump for following through on his commitment to America’s farmers.”   Outdated regulations currently require retailers in many areas of the country to stop selling E15, a blend of gasoline and 15 percent ethanol approved for all vehicles 2001 and newer, during the summer months. Updating this regulation will give consumers year-round access to a fuel choice that can save them between three and 10 cents per gallon.   “Earlier this year, the President correctly described this barrier as ‘unnecessary’ and ‘ridiculous’,”...

Farm, Ethanol Groups Urge President Trump to Restore Integrity to RFS, Allow Year-Round E15 Sales

(Posted Wed. Sep 12th, 2018)

Keywords: ethanol policy

In a letter to President Trump today, the American Farm Bureau Federation, National Corn Growers Association, National Farmers Union, National Sorghum Producers, American Coalition for Ethanol, Growth Energy, and Renewable Fuels Association urged the administration to act immediately to restore the integrity of the Renewable Fuel Standard (RFS) and allow year-round sales of E15 and other mid-level ethanol blends. The groups also expressed concern that any benefit from year-round E15 sales and proper implementation of the RFS could be nullified if refiners are given further regulatory bailouts that undercut the spirit and intent of the law.   The letter follows comments made by Secretary of Agriculture Sonny Perdue on Aug. 29 that an announcement on the RFS and E15 would be coming soon. “With ethanol prices hitting a 13-year low and net farm income plummeting to half of the record $123 billion achieved in 2013, such an announcement could not come at a more critical juncture for...

(Posted Wed. Sep 20th, 2017)

Keywords: Trade Policy

The National Corn Growers Association praised the introduction today of the CREAATE Act, a bill to increase investment in two federal programs with a proven track record of building global demand for U.S. agricultural products.   The bipartisan bill, introduced by Senators Angus King (I-Maine), Joni Ernst (R-Iowa), Joe Donnelly (D-Indiana), and Susan Collins (R-Maine), would increase investment in the Market Access Program (MAP) and Foreign Market Development program (FMD). A companion bill was introduced in the House earlier this year.   MAP and FMD are public-private partnerships that promote U.S. agriculture. Together, they are responsible for 15 percent of U.S. agricultural export revenue—$309 billion since 1977.   “MAP and FMD are critical programs for building and expanding global markets for American agricultural exports. We must increase investment in these programs,” said Wesley Spurlock, a Texas farmer and president of NCGA.   “These programs deliver a strong...

(Posted Thu. Jul 30th, 2015)

Keywords: Policy Transportation

The National Corn Growers Association today expressed disappointment that Congress failed to pass a long-term highway funding bill before its August recess. Congress voted to extend the United States Highway Trust Fund’s authorization through Oct. 29, the second such short-term extension this year. “Once again, Congress kicked the can down the road – and that road is in bad shape,” said NCGA President Chip Bowling, a farmer from Newburg, Maryland. “Farmers rely on our nation’s infrastructure system every day. We need safe, reliable roads and bridges to get our products to market quickly, safely and efficiently. Instead, our roads and bridges are at best, in disrepair, and at worst, unsafe or unusable – and that hurts every farmer in America.” Eighty percent of the domestic corn crop is trucked to market, according to USDA’s Agricultural Marketing Service. By one estimate, America’s transportation deficiencies will cost U.S. agriculture $1.3 billion in exports by 2020....

(Posted Tue. Jun 2nd, 2015)

Keywords: Policy

An internal review of the new Clean Water Rule released by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency and the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers shows that there is much for farmers to be concerned about and that the rule must be revoked and rewritten, the National Corn Growers Association said.   “The scope, reach and effect of the final rule is far too broad as matter of law and good policy,” said NCGA President Chip Bowling, a Maryland farmer. “While it is clear that there have been some changes made to improve the rule as it applies to farmers, these changes only partially work.  At the same time, other changes have been made that actually make the rule significantly worse than the previous proposal.”   Bowling especially noted concerns about prairie potholes and similar bodies of water that can now be regulated by the federal government under the broad reach of the rule; ambiguous standards related to defining tributaries that will be covered; erosional features that may or may not...