NCGA SHARES A-MAIZE-ING STORY OF AMERICAN CORN ONLINE

MARCH 2016

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(Posted Thu. Mar 10th, 2016)

U.S. corn farmers proved their production advances are the trend and not an aberration in 2015, growing the third-largest crop on record, at 13.6 billion bushels, with a near-record national average yield of 168.4 bushels per acre.

 

To highlight this achievement, the National Corn Growers Association delves into the facts about corn production, uses and offers a historical comparison in its newest edition of the World of Corn. This statistical look at the corn industry, both domestic and worldwide, features a wide array of information on corn production and usage. In addition to the traditional statistics guide, this year’s distribution included an activity book that introduces children to the a-maize-ing world of corn.

 

“In 2015, America’s corn farmers showed exactly how amazing the world of maize can be,” NCGA President Chip Bowling and Chief Executive Officer Chris Novak note in the introduction. “Their ability to consistently deliver an abundant, sustainable crop offers an incredible array of opportunities to our world. From fueling cars to filling grocery carts, farmers improve the everyday life of their fellow Americans.”

 

World of Corn is a respected collection of the most important statistics about corn production, exports and consumption, providing key information in a readable format, comparing numbers and trends across the years. 

 

Again this year, NCGA proudly offers an interactive online presentation of the World of Corn that allows users to easily locate information or to explore the limitless possibilities the crop offers at their leisure. The format offers improved navigability with an elegant user interface.

 

To explore the World of Corn online, click here.

 

This year’s publication, which was generously co-sponsored by Monsanto, was distributed in select Farm Futures publications and at the 2016 Commodity Classic in New Orleans.  A special edition of the World of Corn featuring statistics in metric measurements will soon follow.