AS CORN CROP MATURES, CONDITION REMAINS STRONG

JULY 2014

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(Posted Mon. Jul 7th, 2014)

Percentage of corn acres having reached the silking stage progressed to within three points of the five-year average last week, according to a U.S. Department of Agriculture report released today. Despite reports of flooding and other generally detrimental weather conditions across the Corn Belt, the report indicates that the overall condition remained strong with 75 percent of all corn acres rated in good or excellent condition. This total remained stable since the week prior, with the excellent category gaining one point from the good.

 

“With the corn crop entering a crucial stage in its maturation, we are pleased to see that the condition remains strong,” said NCGA President Martin Barbre. “While our crop shows promise today, we are keenly aware of the many challenges which might arise tomorrow. While variables still exist, one fact is certain. America’s corn farmers are using the best and most sustainable practices and most advanced tools to ensure a successful crop in 2014.”

 

Corn acreage having reached the silking stage increased from only five to ten percent total over the past week. As of July 6, 15 percent of total acres had achieved the silking stage, only three points behind the five-year average of 18 percent at this time. Notably, states in which silking surpassed the five-year average, such as Texas, Kentucky and Missouri, increased the national average to closer to the normal. Maturity delays were seen in many states with the greatest being in Tennessee and North Carolina.

 

Again, the 2014 corn crop condition remained stable, indicating quality superior to that seen in the 2013 crop at this point. With 75 percent of the crop in good or excellent condition and only one percent of corn in very poor condition, reports continue to suggest a crop of quality superior to that of the record-production seen the year prior. A lingering drought has had an impact on Kansas, where only 58 percent is rated good or better.

 

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