BILLION TON STUDY UPDATE REAFFIRMS U.S. BIOMASS RESOURCES ABILITY TO MEET ENERGY GOALS

AUGUST 2011

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(Posted Fri. Aug 12th, 2011)

A recent update to the Department of Energy’s Billion Ton Study, which was first conducted in 2005, reaffirms that America has the biomass resources needed to meet oil and other fossil fuel replacement goals outlined in the 2007 Energy Bill’s Renewable Fuel Standard 2.

 

For a full copy of the DOE analysis, click here.

 

Stating that there are sufficient biomass feedstocks to meet expanded renewable fuel standard, the study found that, given a $60 per dry ton price, biofuel feedstock could be plentiful enough to produce nearly 70 billion gallons per year of biofuels by 2022 and substantially more by 2030.

 

The study also specifically addresses corn stover levels, concluding that “corn stover, the largest single source of residue, was estimated between 170 and 256 million dry tons, depending upon yield and tillage assumptions.”

 

“Corn farmers have helped fuel America with domestically-produced, sustainable ethanol for decades now,” said National Corn Growers Association First Vice President Garry Niemeyer. “As we move forward with new technologies, we will continue this proud tradition by offering a plentiful, affordable feedstock for ethanol production, corn stover. Again, this report demonstrates that, through amazing advancements in modern agriculture, we can continue to meet growing demand for food, feed, fiber and fuel.”

 

The study came to these conclusions based on a conservative yield growth assumption of between 1 and 2 percent annually over a 20-year period.